OSLO – Dynamo event & Education thoughts

I’m a lucky guy.

My awesome friend Håvard Vasshaug offers me a while ago the opportunity to present a part of my Dynamo stuff at an Autodesk-Dynamo event in Oslo last week. And it was more than just a presentation. It’s was a true connection.

norway oslo

I don’t know if it’s a common thing in Norway among the population, but there was a very high density of smart, amazing, beautiful people in the audience. Feedback from attendees was so great, questions were straight, meaningful, brilliant. I’m pretty sure other presenters this day, Matt Jezik, Dieter Vermeulen, Håvard Vasshaug, Andreas Dieckmann, are feeling the same.

After my presentation, we had a chat about how I’ve learned Dynamo, Revit API, and how I teach Dynamo to my team and colleagues on a daily basis. I have to admit I never thought about this before.

My way is collaborative education. Educate one, and teach him how to educate others.

Training people requires time and effort. It’s exhausting. But, to me, Sharing knowledge is mandatory. My approach is to spend time and effort with a first team member, patient zero, and bring him as much as I can in a certain amount of time (what can be invest at that moment). Then I support him every day, answering question without any delay. by mail, text, video, no matter. once it has started, it should never stop. Although, it has to be for real, not for training. Learning stuff on projects is a bit hard (deadline, etc…-false, it is very hard) but it forces one to achieve something. No other way. And the lessons learned are worth a gazillion of training hours, not mentioning the fulfillment of the guy doing serious stuff on project. Self-esteem.

The critic moment: deadline is here, boy is scratching his head. You, as a leader or educator, must be present and free to help at this very moment. Support by providing ideas, new path, workaround. Even DO things, with explanation and pedagogy,  so that the wheel keeps spinning. You, as a new-born-team, will succeed.

Now this dude is ready to educate another. Proud, relax, knowing he has minimum skill to follow his path, with you watching his back. He’s not really aware of this, but I give him no choice. Patient zero must teach others. And so it goes on with the next team member.

I keep training patient zero, reaching new level, by supporting his effort. Be there, communicate, listen, investigate after issues (when a long silent pause occurs….). Of course I do help next guys, but patient zero is so happy to share his knowledge. He will act like this forever. Job done.

With other team members, I now only act as “an expert” that answers questions when they agreed it was out of range for their actual skill. The more the team grows, the less questions I have.

After a huge effort from my side at the beginning, I now have free time beside answering questions to make some progress myself in what is my job and passion. I don’t think I’m doing anything special, no revolution, no “”AMAZING”” comment. But this was the talk we had. And it was really cool.

Tell me what you think.

BTW, find here my presentation.

OSLO ADSK event 082015 J Benoit LEG_Final